Our Dermatology Blog

Posts for: December, 2016

By WARRENTON DERMATOLOGY & SKIN THERAPY CENTER
December 27, 2016
Category: Skin Care

Article Excerpts from Dermatology Times

Many state-of- the-art skin products contain vitamin C, a potent antioxidant which is important to skin health. Vitamin C is actually a secondary antioxidant in the skin, able to donate an electron to vitamin E, which is the primary antioxidant. As part of the electron donation process, the vitamin C itself becomes oxidized. This process can be observed on a daily basis when cut fruit is left out. Freshly cut peaches have a vivid orange/yellow color due to their high vitamin C content. However, left on the table for several hours at room temperature, the peaches will turn brown. This browning is due to oxidation of the vitamin C, and the color change is due to a chemical reaction occurring as the electron is lost. Once the electron is lost, the vitamin C is no longer an active vitamin, meaning the vitamin C content/benefit of a fresh cut peach is much higher than the vitamin C content/benefit of a browned peach.

Now consider vitamin C serums for facial anti-aging purposes.  When in the vitamin C is in high concentration, the serum will have a yellowish color; but as it oxidizes, it will turn brown/orange.  Cosmetic vitamin C preparations that have discolored should be discarded as they have already oxidized and cannot provide skin benefits.  Vitamin C preparations can also discolor on the skin surface as they contact oxygen in the environment.  This accounts for the orange color that may emerge on the skin in the morning after wearing a vitamin C preparation overnight. For this reason, vitamin C serums should be stored in dark packaging that does not allow light or oxygen to reach the product.  It is also important that you not leave packaging open to the air for an extended period of time.

Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center recommends these vitamin C products for daytime anti-aging and anti-oxidant protection:

Serum: IS Clinical Pro-Heal Serum for Face & C Eye Serum for the eye area

Lotion: Revision Skincare Vitamin C Lotion 30%


By WARRENTON DERMATOLOGY & SKIN THERAPY CENTER
December 07, 2016
Category: Dermatology
Tags: Skin Care   Dry Skin  

All of us have likely experienced the discomfort of dry, itchy skin at some time in our lives, and a few applications of lotion is often dry skinenough to control it. But for people who deal with chronically dry skin, it can affect their daily lives, making it difficult to sleep or wear clothing. At Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center in Warrenton, Virginia, our dermatology professionals are committed to helping patients understand why conditions like dry skin happen and how to manage their symptoms effectively.

What causes dry skin?

There are many reasons why the skin loses moisture and becomes dry. Many patients with dry skin visit their dermatologist in the colder months, when the weather in Warrenton is cold and the humidity is low. With central heating and space heaters running during this time, the issue is compounded. External factors like hot baths and showers, as well as certain soaps and detergents, can also make some people's skin feel dried out and itchy. Chronic conditions like allergies, eczema or psoriasis are also to blame. If scratching leads to open sores on the skin, secondary bacterial infections can develop.

How can I treat my dry skin?

At Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center, dry skin is a common problem seen by our dermatologist Dr. Juan-Carlos Caballero. The first step to treating dry skin is to diagnose its source. If the problem is caused by a chemical found in soap or detergent, for example, your Warrenton skin care professional will advise you to switch to a hypoallergenic brand. Allergies may also be alleviated when the trigger is avoided. More complicated skin conditions may respond well to medicated ointments, oral medication or other therapies. Whatever the cause of your dry skin, it's important to follow your Warren dermatologist's instructions to stay comfortable and keep itchy skin at bay.

If dry skin has left you frustrated and uncomfortable, contact Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center in Warrenton, Virginia. We'd be happy to schedule an appointment so you can alleviate your dry skin as soon as possible!


By WARRENTON DERMATOLOGY & SKIN THERAPY CENTER
December 06, 2016
Category: Nail Health
Tags: Dermatologist   nails   healthy nails   nail problems   Tips  

Your nails dry out as you age, losing the natural oils which act as a glue to hold the nail layers together. Exposing your hands to harsh soaps, cleaning products, solvents and rough work makes things worse. At first your nails begin to ‘fray’ on the edges, becoming brittle. Eventually the layers split.  Ironically, “nail hardeners” make this worse, because the alcohols, formaldehyde and other chemicals in those products really dry out your natural oils. So, what can you do about brittle nails?

1. Hydrate and Add Oils. Use creams, oils and ointments on your nails every day, after they've been wet.The best hydrating ingredients for nails are Shea Butter, Jojoba oil, avocado oil, or other rich natural oils.  The thicker the cream the better, and oils or ointments are best. The trick is to use something that stays put for a while and doesn’t just rub off right away. “Bag Balm”, which contains lanolin, is a great option. Always moisturize skin and nails immediately after water exposure; applying moisturizers to dry nails is a waste of time.  Put your moisturizer on within minutes after your bath or shower (or after washing your hands), and do it as often as possible.  
 
2. Clip and file your nails when they're wet. Clipping and filing dry nails makes the splits worse, so always do this after water exposure (i.e. bath or shower).  Towel off the water and then use sharp nail clippers to trim your nails, followed by gently filing the edges.  You can also very gently buff the nail edges to keep the splitting layers from catching on things and progressing down the nail.

3. Wear gloves when you do rough work or get your hands into harsh chemicals.

4. Supplement your diet: Gelatin capsules won’t help you, but vitamin supplements formulated specifically for nail growth (containing biotin) may help. However, many of the ingredients in these supplements are lavishly present in whole foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, natural oils, beans and fish.  Eating a richly nutritious diet is key to supporting healthy nails, and vitamin supplements should be used in addition to, not in place of a healthy diet.

There are diseases that can affect splitting fingernails, the most common being thyroid problems and anemia.  Some skin diseases affect the nails, as well, and can cause splitting.  If your nails don't improve using these easy remedies, we recommend you

Call (540) 341-1900 to make an appointment with
Dr. Caballero, Audrey Ludwig-Bunch, PA-C or Heather Callahan, PA-C
at Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center