Our Dermatology Blog

Posts for tag: anti-aging

By Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center
January 23, 2017
Category: Nail Health
Tags: nails   Tips   anti-aging   Hands   IPL  

Our hands are one of the most important parts of our body when it comes to day-to- day activities, and they are revealing, too. "It used to be common for doctors to look at the hands for important clues to overall health," says endocrinologist Kenneth Blanchard. “Hands can tell you a great deal about circulation, hormones, and thyroid function."

Here are 5 important clues your hands can reveal about your overall health:

Blotchy Red Palms: In the short term, red palms might mean you gripped the shovel too hard, washed a few too many dishes, or grabbed the teakettle too soon (or you are pregnant, as red palms may be normal due to increased blood flow). But if your palms remain reddened over a long period of time, this may be a condition called palmar erythema, which could be a sign of liver disease, particularly of cirrhosis and non-alcoholic fatty liver.

The Length of Your Fingers: Comparative finger length can tell you a surprising amount about your likelihood of having certain conditions. Typically, men's ring fingers tend to be longer than their index fingers, while in women it's the opposite. Women who have a "masculinized" pattern, with ring fingers longer than their index fingers, are twice as likely to suffer from osteoarthritis, according to a 2008 study published in Arthritis and Rheumatism. Longer index fingers, on the other hand, are associated with a higher risk of breast cancer in women and with a lower risk of prostate cancer in men. A 2010 study found that men whose index fingers were noticeably longer than their ring fingers were 33 percent less likely to develop prostate cancer.

Swollen Fingers: Swollen fingers can happen for the simplest of reasons like it's hot outside or you’ve eaten salty foods. But if your fingers feel thick and stiff or your rings still won't fit after several days of drinking plenty of fluids and cutting back on salt, the swelling could suggest hypothyroidism.

Pale Nails or Red Stripes Under the Nails: Under normal circumstances, if you press gently on your fingernails they turn white, and then when you release the pressure they turn pink again. If your nails stay white more than a minute after you press on them, or they look pale all the time, this can be a sign of anemia. Red stripes under the nails are called splinter hemorrhages because they look like tiny red or brownish splinters under the nails. These are minute areas of bleeding that run in the direction of nail growth, and they can signal infection in the heart or blood.

Thick, Rounded Fingertips: Known as "clubbing" thickened fingertips that angle out above the last knuckle like miniature clubs can be a sign of heart or lung disease. You may also notice the nail rounding, so your fingers curve downward like the inside of a spoon. 

If you are concerned about what your hands may be telling you about your health, contact your doctor for a medical evaluation.

By WARRENTON DERMATOLOGY & SKIN THERAPY CENTER
December 27, 2016
Category: Skin Care

Article Excerpts from Dermatology Times

Many state-of- the-art skin products contain vitamin C, a potent antioxidant which is important to skin health. Vitamin C is actually a secondary antioxidant in the skin, able to donate an electron to vitamin E, which is the primary antioxidant. As part of the electron donation process, the vitamin C itself becomes oxidized. This process can be observed on a daily basis when cut fruit is left out. Freshly cut peaches have a vivid orange/yellow color due to their high vitamin C content. However, left on the table for several hours at room temperature, the peaches will turn brown. This browning is due to oxidation of the vitamin C, and the color change is due to a chemical reaction occurring as the electron is lost. Once the electron is lost, the vitamin C is no longer an active vitamin, meaning the vitamin C content/benefit of a fresh cut peach is much higher than the vitamin C content/benefit of a browned peach.

Now consider vitamin C serums for facial anti-aging purposes.  When in the vitamin C is in high concentration, the serum will have a yellowish color; but as it oxidizes, it will turn brown/orange.  Cosmetic vitamin C preparations that have discolored should be discarded as they have already oxidized and cannot provide skin benefits.  Vitamin C preparations can also discolor on the skin surface as they contact oxygen in the environment.  This accounts for the orange color that may emerge on the skin in the morning after wearing a vitamin C preparation overnight. For this reason, vitamin C serums should be stored in dark packaging that does not allow light or oxygen to reach the product.  It is also important that you not leave packaging open to the air for an extended period of time.

Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center recommends these vitamin C products for daytime anti-aging and anti-oxidant protection:

Serum: IS Clinical Pro-Heal Serum for Face & C Eye Serum for the eye area

Lotion: Revision Skincare Vitamin C Lotion 30%

By WARRENTON DERMATOLOGY & SKIN THERAPY CENTER
September 23, 2016
Category: Skin Health

There have been many studies about how diet impacts skin disease. The exciting takeaway from most of these studies is that we can, in part, control our overall skin health and appearance through diet. One such study of the Mediterranean diet, which is considered anti-inflammatory and low glycemic, revealed several skin health benefits worth noting.

“To maintain healthy skin, one’s diet must be rich in antioxidants, which are also anti-inflammatory,” says Dermatologist Jeanette Jacknin, MD. “Free radical damage has been shown to be an important factor in the aging process, as well as in the development of cancer. It is also thought to be the root cause of wrinkles and aging skin with sagging, discoloration, enlarged pores, and lack of radiance. Unfortunately, the typical North American diet contains excessive amounts of simple carbohydrates and saturated fats, which has been shown to correlate with an increased appearance of skin wrinkles and other skin problems.”

According to Dr. Jacknin, “The Mediterranean diet is beneficial for the skin, as its anti-inflammatory effect is due largely to its emphasis on extra virgin olive oil, which is high in compounds that modulate oxidative stress and quell inflammatory reactions.” Oleocanthal, one of the components of olive oil, has recently been shown to possess anti-inflammatory actions similar to ibuprofen. It has also been suggested that a nutritional approach to sun protection using the Mediterranean diet would be a useful complement to topically applied sun protection.

Healthy skin is also well-hydrated skin, and it is recommended that we drink a minimum of eight glasses of pure or sparkling water a day, and limit our intake of dehydrating coffee, alcohol, and colas. Eat fish, rolled oats and ground flax seeds frequently, as they are high in omega-3 essential fatty acids which help the skin to retain moisture. Grapes, berries, plums, pears, seaweeds and algae all contain sorbitol, which also helps prevent dehydration. Source: Dermatology Times