Our Dermatology Blog

Posts for tag: Tips

July 13, 2018
Category: Dermatology
Tags: safety   Tips   sun exposure   Burns  

According to dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), first-degree burns are very common and frequently occur after accidentally touching a hot stove, curling iron or hair straightener. Sunburn can also be a first-degree burn. Burns can easily happen during summer firework and campfire season; However, unlike the more severe second or third-degree burns, first-degree burns only involve the top layer of the skin. If you have a first-degree burn, your skin may be red and painful, and you may experience mild swelling.

“Most first-degree burns can be treated at home, however, it’s important to know what to do,” says boardcertified dermatologist Darrell S. Rigel, MD, a clinical professor at New York University. “Although first-degree burns aren’t as serious as higher-degree burns, they can hurt quite a bit and can leave a scar if not properly treated.”

To treat a first-degree burn, Dr. Rigel recommends the following:

  1. Cool the burn. Immediately immerse the burn in cool tap water or apply cold, wet compresses. Do this for about 10 minutes or until the pain subsides.
  2. Apply petroleum jelly two to three times daily. Do not apply ointments, toothpaste or butter to the burn, as these may cause an infection. Do not apply topical antibiotics.
  3. Cover the burn with a nonstick, sterile bandage. If blisters form, let them heal on their own while keeping the area covered. Do not pop the blisters.
  4. Consider taking over-the-counter pain medication. Acetaminophen or ibuprofen can help relieve the pain and reduce inflammation.
  5. Protect the area from the sun. Once the burn heals, protect it from the sun by seeking shade, wearing protective clothing, or applying a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. This will help minimize scarring, as the redness from a burn sometimes persists for weeks, especially in those with darker skin tones.

“First-degree burns usually heal on their own without treatment from a doctor,” says Dr. Rigel. “However, if your first-degree burn is very large, if the victim is an infant or elderly person, or if you think your burn is more severe, go to an emergency room immediately.”

October 12, 2017
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Tips   Skin Care   Hydration   products   Moisturizer  

Moisturizers, Luminosity & Skin Firmness Q & A

Q:  How does a moisturizer increase skin firmness?

A:  “Increased firmness” is commonly used by skincare companies to describe the beneficial effects of moisturizers. 

You should know that the substance that naturally gives our skin firmness is collagen, while the substance that increases skin firmness from the use of a moisturizer is water. Moisturizers work by creating an environment for enhanced water content in the skin. Ingredients such as dimethicone, petrolatum, mineral oil, and hyaluronic acid reduce trans-epidermal water loss, thereby increasing the skin’s water content. When the skin is full of water, it becomes firmer – like a full water balloon, versus a half-full water balloon. Likewise, if you want your skin to be more luminous, it needs to be well hydrated.

Product Suggestion:

Revision Skincare Hydrating Serum, an oil-free moisturizing serum with 2 kinds of Hyaluronic Acid for both short and long-term skin hydration.

Q:  How does makeup enhance the luminosity of the skin?

A:  Luminosity is a measure of the intensity of the light reflected from the skin’s surface as it bounces back into the observer’s eye. The amount of light reflected from the skin is dependent on how smooth the skin is. Many facial foundations also enhance light reflection by adding very small light reflective particles and pigments suspended within the liquid foundation. These small particles cannot be seen on the skin’s surface without magnifications, and they create a facial glow that is attractive and youthful, even though the skin beneath the foundation may not be perfectly smooth. This optical illusion is the magic of makeup!

Product Suggestion: 

If you want the skin to really be smoother (so you don’t need magic makeup), you should be using a physician-grade Retinol product (topical Vitamin A). Drugstore products will not have a high enough concentration of the active ingredients necessary to affect change to the skin. Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center has a variety of pharmaceutical-grade products, like prescription Obagi NuDerm Tretinoin (Retin-A) and non-prescription Revision Skincare Retinol Complete 1.0.

Ask our skin-care specialists for a personalized recommendation, or Call (540) 341-1900 to schedule a FREE Cosmetic Consultation appointment for a customized skincare plan.

 

By Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center
January 23, 2017
Category: Nail Health
Tags: nails   Tips   anti-aging   Hands   IPL  

Our hands are one of the most important parts of our body when it comes to day-to- day activities, and they are revealing, too. "It used to be common for doctors to look at the hands for important clues to overall health," says endocrinologist Kenneth Blanchard. “Hands can tell you a great deal about circulation, hormones, and thyroid function."

Here are 5 important clues your hands can reveal about your overall health:

Blotchy Red Palms: In the short term, red palms might mean you gripped the shovel too hard, washed a few too many dishes, or grabbed the teakettle too soon (or you are pregnant, as red palms may be normal due to increased blood flow). But if your palms remain reddened over a long period of time, this may be a condition called palmar erythema, which could be a sign of liver disease, particularly of cirrhosis and non-alcoholic fatty liver.

The Length of Your Fingers: Comparative finger length can tell you a surprising amount about your likelihood of having certain conditions. Typically, men's ring fingers tend to be longer than their index fingers, while in women it's the opposite. Women who have a "masculinized" pattern, with ring fingers longer than their index fingers, are twice as likely to suffer from osteoarthritis, according to a 2008 study published in Arthritis and Rheumatism. Longer index fingers, on the other hand, are associated with a higher risk of breast cancer in women and with a lower risk of prostate cancer in men. A 2010 study found that men whose index fingers were noticeably longer than their ring fingers were 33 percent less likely to develop prostate cancer.

Swollen Fingers: Swollen fingers can happen for the simplest of reasons like it's hot outside or you’ve eaten salty foods. But if your fingers feel thick and stiff or your rings still won't fit after several days of drinking plenty of fluids and cutting back on salt, the swelling could suggest hypothyroidism.

Pale Nails or Red Stripes Under the Nails: Under normal circumstances, if you press gently on your fingernails they turn white, and then when you release the pressure they turn pink again. If your nails stay white more than a minute after you press on them, or they look pale all the time, this can be a sign of anemia. Red stripes under the nails are called splinter hemorrhages because they look like tiny red or brownish splinters under the nails. These are minute areas of bleeding that run in the direction of nail growth, and they can signal infection in the heart or blood.

Thick, Rounded Fingertips: Known as "clubbing" thickened fingertips that angle out above the last knuckle like miniature clubs can be a sign of heart or lung disease. You may also notice the nail rounding, so your fingers curve downward like the inside of a spoon. 

If you are concerned about what your hands may be telling you about your health, contact your doctor for a medical evaluation.

By WARRENTON DERMATOLOGY & SKIN THERAPY CENTER
December 27, 2016
Category: Skin Care

Article Excerpts from Dermatology Times

Many state-of- the-art skin products contain vitamin C, a potent antioxidant which is important to skin health. Vitamin C is actually a secondary antioxidant in the skin, able to donate an electron to vitamin E, which is the primary antioxidant. As part of the electron donation process, the vitamin C itself becomes oxidized. This process can be observed on a daily basis when cut fruit is left out. Freshly cut peaches have a vivid orange/yellow color due to their high vitamin C content. However, left on the table for several hours at room temperature, the peaches will turn brown. This browning is due to oxidation of the vitamin C, and the color change is due to a chemical reaction occurring as the electron is lost. Once the electron is lost, the vitamin C is no longer an active vitamin, meaning the vitamin C content/benefit of a fresh cut peach is much higher than the vitamin C content/benefit of a browned peach.

Now consider vitamin C serums for facial anti-aging purposes.  When in the vitamin C is in high concentration, the serum will have a yellowish color; but as it oxidizes, it will turn brown/orange.  Cosmetic vitamin C preparations that have discolored should be discarded as they have already oxidized and cannot provide skin benefits.  Vitamin C preparations can also discolor on the skin surface as they contact oxygen in the environment.  This accounts for the orange color that may emerge on the skin in the morning after wearing a vitamin C preparation overnight. For this reason, vitamin C serums should be stored in dark packaging that does not allow light or oxygen to reach the product.  It is also important that you not leave packaging open to the air for an extended period of time.

Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center recommends these vitamin C products for daytime anti-aging and anti-oxidant protection:

Serum: IS Clinical Pro-Heal Serum for Face & C Eye Serum for the eye area

Lotion: Revision Skincare Vitamin C Lotion 30%

By WARRENTON DERMATOLOGY & SKIN THERAPY CENTER
December 06, 2016
Category: Nail Health
Tags: Dermatologist   nails   healthy nails   nail problems   Tips  

Your nails dry out as you age, losing the natural oils which act as a glue to hold the nail layers together. Exposing your hands to harsh soaps, cleaning products, solvents and rough work makes things worse. At first your nails begin to ‘fray’ on the edges, becoming brittle. Eventually the layers split.  Ironically, “nail hardeners” make this worse, because the alcohols, formaldehyde and other chemicals in those products really dry out your natural oils. So, what can you do about brittle nails?

1. Hydrate and Add Oils. Use creams, oils and ointments on your nails every day, after they've been wet.The best hydrating ingredients for nails are Shea Butter, Jojoba oil, avocado oil, or other rich natural oils.  The thicker the cream the better, and oils or ointments are best. The trick is to use something that stays put for a while and doesn’t just rub off right away. “Bag Balm”, which contains lanolin, is a great option. Always moisturize skin and nails immediately after water exposure; applying moisturizers to dry nails is a waste of time.  Put your moisturizer on within minutes after your bath or shower (or after washing your hands), and do it as often as possible.  
 
2. Clip and file your nails when they're wet. Clipping and filing dry nails makes the splits worse, so always do this after water exposure (i.e. bath or shower).  Towel off the water and then use sharp nail clippers to trim your nails, followed by gently filing the edges.  You can also very gently buff the nail edges to keep the splitting layers from catching on things and progressing down the nail.

3. Wear gloves when you do rough work or get your hands into harsh chemicals.

4. Supplement your diet: Gelatin capsules won’t help you, but vitamin supplements formulated specifically for nail growth (containing biotin) may help. However, many of the ingredients in these supplements are lavishly present in whole foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, natural oils, beans and fish.  Eating a richly nutritious diet is key to supporting healthy nails, and vitamin supplements should be used in addition to, not in place of a healthy diet.

There are diseases that can affect splitting fingernails, the most common being thyroid problems and anemia.  Some skin diseases affect the nails, as well, and can cause splitting.  If your nails don't improve using these easy remedies, we recommend you

Call (540) 341-1900 to make an appointment with
Dr. Caballero, Audrey Ludwig-Bunch, PA-C or Heather Callahan, PA-C
at Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center