Our Dermatology Blog

Posts for tag: Tips

If you’ve been hitting the gym on account of your New Year’s resolutions, it is likely that you are reaping the benefits, including improved overall health and mood. However, gymgoers may also find that their skin is breaking out more than usual, putting a damper on your post-workout glow.
 
According to dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology, working out can cause excessive sweating, as well as a buildup of oil, dirt and bacteria on your skin — all of which can lead to acne. Despite this, people don’t have to quit exercising in order to see clearer skin. The key, according to board certified dermatologist Dr. J.C. Caballero, is to maintain proper hygiene before, during and after your workouts.
 
While exercise itself doesn’t cause acne, the skin care habits you maintain around your workouts can significantly impact your skin. Germs thrive at the gym, so it’s important to maintain good hygiene while working out to prevent clogged pores and the spread of bacteria.
 
To help prevent acne caused by working out, Dr. Caballero recommends the following tips:
1. Dress in clean, loose-fitting, moisture-wicking clothes that won’t rub your skin. Clothing and accessories that are too tight, such as headbands, bra straps or spandex garments, can cause a type of acne that occurs at the spot of repeated friction.
2. Remove any makeup before working out, as makeup can clog your pores. Use an oil-free makeup remover, towelette or micellar water to take makeup off your face.
3. Before exercising outdoors, generously apply sunscreen on any skin not covered by clothing. Not only do the sun’s harmful UV rays cause skin cancer and premature skin aging, unprotected exposure can also cause breakouts. This is because the sun dries out your skin, leading to more oil production. To help, apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. Look for formulas that are water resistant and labeled “oil free”, “noncomedogenic” or “won’t clog pores.”
4. During your workout, keep your skin dry. Use a clean towel to gently pat sweat off of your body, since rubbing your skin can cause acne to flare.
5. Wipe off shared equipment. Shared workout equipment can be full of acne-causing bacteria and dirt. Most gyms supply a cleaning spray or towelettes to wipe off the equipment. Clean off the equipment before and after your workout as a courtesy to others.
6. After your workout, shower immediately. Use warm — not hot — water to remove sweat, dirt and oil from your skin. Wash acne-prone skin with a mild cleanser that is labeled “oil free”, “non-comedogenic” or “won’t clog pores.” However, if your skin tends to be oily and not dry, consider using a cleanser with salicylic acid or benzoyl peroxide instead. If you can’t shower immediately, wash your hands, and wipe off your face using a pad that contains salicylic acid. In addition, take a spare t-shirt and change out of your sweaty clothing.
7. After showering, change into clean clothes and wash the dirty clothes, which is full of sweat and pore-clogging culprits. Always wash your gym clothes between workouts.
 

If you still have acne after following these tips, make an appointment at Warrenton Dermatology to talk to a board-certified dermatologist. 540-341-1900

By WARRENTON DERMATOLOGY & SKIN THERAPY CENTER
January 31, 2019
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Dermatologist   Tips   Skin Care   Dry Skin   Winter  

winterskinThe winter months can be tough on skin. While most people think summer sun exposure is the hardest on the skin, winter can be just as difficult for our skin cells. In cold, dry winter climates, skin is prone to itching and flaking. Without an effective winter skin care routine, you may experience significant discomfort and potential damage throughout the winter season.

Changes in temperature and humidity can negatively impact your skin’s health. The main cause for concern during winter months is dryness. Cold weather usually means decreased humidity. Windy winter weather and use of heaters will further strip the skin of moisture. Dry skin can feel scaly, chapped or tight, and it may even crack open and bleed. Those who suffer from chronic skin conditions like eczema are much more likely to deal with flare-ups during winter months. The main goal of skin care during winter months is to avoid stripping moisture from the skin and take steps to alleviate dryness.

Winter Skincare Tips:

Turn Down the Heat – It’s not just air temperature that effects your skin…water temperature is very important. Turn down the heat in the shower or bath, as hot water can worsen dry skin; and limit your bath and shower time, because prolonged exposure will also dry out your skin. Apply a moisturizer immediately following your shower or bath.

Major Moisturizer - Use a thick, cream-based moisturizer at least twice per day over the entire body. You should apply a moisturizer immediately following your shower or bath and at least one other time during the day. If you start to experience itching or notice cracking and dryness, apply moisturizer to the affected area right away.

Use a Humidifier - Constantly running heaters during the cold, winter months can strip moisture from the skin. Consider installing a furnace humidifier or putting a humidifier in your bedroom. These humidifiers can replace some of the moisture that the heater is stripping from your home.

Cover Up - Exposure to wind, snow, and ice can also negatively impact your skin. Protect your skin by covering it with accessories like gloves, hats and scarves. For sports like skiing and snowboarding, make sure you wear goggles and other barrier clothing to protect your skin from chapping and windburn. If your clothing becomes saturated with water from melting snow or ice, you should find warm, dry clothing as soon as possible.

Drink Water - Dehydration is not a summer-only concern. Drinking water won’t immediately add moisture to the skin, but regularly consuming plenty of water will help to keep skin cells hydrated. Drink at least 64 fluid ounces of water each day, which is about 8 glasses.

Sunscreen All Day, Every Day - Skin that is exposed to the sun, even in limited amounts, should be protected with sunscreen on a daily basis. There are many sunscreens that can serve as an effective daily moisturizer and sunscreen (get EltaMD UV Lotion at Warrenton Dermatology). Look for SPF 30 or higher.

Protect Your Lips - Our lips are just as likely to become dry, chapped and sun exposed as the rest of the body. Apply a liberal coat of balm with sunscreen built in several times throughout the day. Aloe Vera and Vitamin E are often used to heal damaged skin and relieve dryness, as well.

Visit A Skincare Specialist at Warrenton Dermatology – our skincare professionals are here to help you! Schedule a medical visit for treatment of skin issues that flare in the winter, or schedule a complimentary skin care consultation appointment for help in finding the right products and winter skincare routine just for you. 540-341-1900

July 13, 2018
Category: Dermatology
Tags: safety   Tips   sun exposure   Burns  

According to dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), first-degree burns are very common and frequently occur after accidentally touching a hot stove, curling iron or hair straightener. Sunburn can also be a first-degree burn. Burns can easily happen during summer firework and campfire season; However, unlike the more severe second or third-degree burns, first-degree burns only involve the top layer of the skin. If you have a first-degree burn, your skin may be red and painful, and you may experience mild swelling.

“Most first-degree burns can be treated at home, however, it’s important to know what to do,” says boardcertified dermatologist Darrell S. Rigel, MD, a clinical professor at New York University. “Although first-degree burns aren’t as serious as higher-degree burns, they can hurt quite a bit and can leave a scar if not properly treated.”

To treat a first-degree burn, Dr. Rigel recommends the following:

  1. Cool the burn. Immediately immerse the burn in cool tap water or apply cold, wet compresses. Do this for about 10 minutes or until the pain subsides.
  2. Apply petroleum jelly two to three times daily. Do not apply ointments, toothpaste or butter to the burn, as these may cause an infection. Do not apply topical antibiotics.
  3. Cover the burn with a nonstick, sterile bandage. If blisters form, let them heal on their own while keeping the area covered. Do not pop the blisters.
  4. Consider taking over-the-counter pain medication. Acetaminophen or ibuprofen can help relieve the pain and reduce inflammation.
  5. Protect the area from the sun. Once the burn heals, protect it from the sun by seeking shade, wearing protective clothing, or applying a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. This will help minimize scarring, as the redness from a burn sometimes persists for weeks, especially in those with darker skin tones.

“First-degree burns usually heal on their own without treatment from a doctor,” says Dr. Rigel. “However, if your first-degree burn is very large, if the victim is an infant or elderly person, or if you think your burn is more severe, go to an emergency room immediately.”

October 12, 2017
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Tips   Skin Care   Hydration   products   Moisturizer  

Moisturizers, Luminosity & Skin Firmness Q & A

Q:  How does a moisturizer increase skin firmness?

A:  “Increased firmness” is commonly used by skincare companies to describe the beneficial effects of moisturizers. 

You should know that the substance that naturally gives our skin firmness is collagen, while the substance that increases skin firmness from the use of a moisturizer is water. Moisturizers work by creating an environment for enhanced water content in the skin. Ingredients such as dimethicone, petrolatum, mineral oil, and hyaluronic acid reduce trans-epidermal water loss, thereby increasing the skin’s water content. When the skin is full of water, it becomes firmer – like a full water balloon, versus a half-full water balloon. Likewise, if you want your skin to be more luminous, it needs to be well hydrated.

Product Suggestion:

Revision Skincare Hydrating Serum, an oil-free moisturizing serum with 2 kinds of Hyaluronic Acid for both short and long-term skin hydration.

Q:  How does makeup enhance the luminosity of the skin?

A:  Luminosity is a measure of the intensity of the light reflected from the skin’s surface as it bounces back into the observer’s eye. The amount of light reflected from the skin is dependent on how smooth the skin is. Many facial foundations also enhance light reflection by adding very small light reflective particles and pigments suspended within the liquid foundation. These small particles cannot be seen on the skin’s surface without magnifications, and they create a facial glow that is attractive and youthful, even though the skin beneath the foundation may not be perfectly smooth. This optical illusion is the magic of makeup!

Product Suggestion: 

If you want the skin to really be smoother (so you don’t need magic makeup), you should be using a physician-grade Retinol product (topical Vitamin A). Drugstore products will not have a high enough concentration of the active ingredients necessary to affect change to the skin. Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center has a variety of pharmaceutical-grade products, like prescription Obagi NuDerm Tretinoin (Retin-A) and non-prescription Revision Skincare Retinol Complete 1.0.

Ask our skin-care specialists for a personalized recommendation, or Call (540) 341-1900 to schedule a FREE Cosmetic Consultation appointment for a customized skincare plan.

 

By Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center
January 23, 2017
Category: Nail Health
Tags: nails   Tips   anti-aging   Hands   IPL  

Our hands are one of the most important parts of our body when it comes to day-to- day activities, and they are revealing, too. "It used to be common for doctors to look at the hands for important clues to overall health," says endocrinologist Kenneth Blanchard. “Hands can tell you a great deal about circulation, hormones, and thyroid function."

Here are 5 important clues your hands can reveal about your overall health:

Blotchy Red Palms: In the short term, red palms might mean you gripped the shovel too hard, washed a few too many dishes, or grabbed the teakettle too soon (or you are pregnant, as red palms may be normal due to increased blood flow). But if your palms remain reddened over a long period of time, this may be a condition called palmar erythema, which could be a sign of liver disease, particularly of cirrhosis and non-alcoholic fatty liver.

The Length of Your Fingers: Comparative finger length can tell you a surprising amount about your likelihood of having certain conditions. Typically, men's ring fingers tend to be longer than their index fingers, while in women it's the opposite. Women who have a "masculinized" pattern, with ring fingers longer than their index fingers, are twice as likely to suffer from osteoarthritis, according to a 2008 study published in Arthritis and Rheumatism. Longer index fingers, on the other hand, are associated with a higher risk of breast cancer in women and with a lower risk of prostate cancer in men. A 2010 study found that men whose index fingers were noticeably longer than their ring fingers were 33 percent less likely to develop prostate cancer.

Swollen Fingers: Swollen fingers can happen for the simplest of reasons like it's hot outside or you’ve eaten salty foods. But if your fingers feel thick and stiff or your rings still won't fit after several days of drinking plenty of fluids and cutting back on salt, the swelling could suggest hypothyroidism.

Pale Nails or Red Stripes Under the Nails: Under normal circumstances, if you press gently on your fingernails they turn white, and then when you release the pressure they turn pink again. If your nails stay white more than a minute after you press on them, or they look pale all the time, this can be a sign of anemia. Red stripes under the nails are called splinter hemorrhages because they look like tiny red or brownish splinters under the nails. These are minute areas of bleeding that run in the direction of nail growth, and they can signal infection in the heart or blood.

Thick, Rounded Fingertips: Known as "clubbing" thickened fingertips that angle out above the last knuckle like miniature clubs can be a sign of heart or lung disease. You may also notice the nail rounding, so your fingers curve downward like the inside of a spoon. 

If you are concerned about what your hands may be telling you about your health, contact your doctor for a medical evaluation.