Our Dermatology Blog

Posts for tag: rashes

September 05, 2017
Category: Dermatology
Tags: Acne   rashes   Skin rash   IPL   Rosacea   Facial Redness  

Rosacea: What You Need to Know

Rosacea is a skin disorder which causes inflammation and red coloring of the skin, especially on the face. It can also impacts the ears, chest, and back.  In addition to a “flushed” appearance, pimples and bumps may accompany the redness. It occurs most commonly in people aged 30-60 with fair skin, and it is now estimated by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) that 16 million Americans suffer from the signs and symptoms of Rosacea. Many celebrities are said to have struggled with Rosacea, including: Princess Diana, Prince William, Cynthia Nixon, Bill Clinton, Renee Zellweger, Rembrandt, W.C. Fields, Cameron Diaz, Sam Smith, and Rosie O’Donnell, to name a few.

Rosacea can cause more than just the classic redness. Due to varying symptoms, this disorder has four subtypes:

  1. Erythematotelangiectatic Rosacea: Redness, flushing, visible blood vessels – looks much like a bad sunburn. Visible blood vessels can turn into spider veins if untreated.
  2. Papulopustular Rosacea: Redness, swelling, and acne-like breakouts.
  3. Phymatous Rosacea: Skin thickens and has a bumpy texture, people are often embarrassed of the appearance of their skin.
  4. Ocular Rosacea: Eyes red and irritated, eyelids swell, sty-like bumps in the eye area.

There are many triggers, such as stress, eating spicy and/or acidic foods, drinking caffeine, dramatic fluctuations in temperature or allergic reaction. So, the first and most important step to controlling the symptoms of Rosacea is lifestyle modifications. It is important to consult with a Board Certified Dermatologist, like Dr. Caballero at Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center, to get proper diagnosis and counseling. Oral and/or topical medications may be prescribed, and appropriate skincare products will be recommended by highly trained skincare professionals. The goal is to stabilize the symptoms of your Rosacea. Unfortunately, there is no cure for this disorder and you may experience a recurrence or “flair” at some point.

One of the most effective treatments for facial and chest/décolleté Rosacea is the use of intense pulsed light photo facial, also known as IPL or photo-rejuvenation. It typically requires a series of treatments, and patients experience 50% to 75% or better control of their symptoms.

Successful treatment can be life changing for a Rosacea patient. This is what one of our patients had to say (her before and after photo accompanies this article): “I always thought I had acne – then I was diagnosed with Rosacea by Heather Callahan, PA-C at Warrenton Dermatology. I followed her treatment plan and started topical medications, as well as a series of IPL treatments. Now my Rosacea is under control and I can’t believe how great my skin looks.”

If you think you may have Rosacea, call Warrenton Dermatology at (540) 341-1900 for an appointment to find out for sure. We can help!

May 26, 2017
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: rashes   Skin rash   Dry Skin   eczema  

Atopic Eczema

Eczema

Also called “dermatitis,” eczema refers to several different rash-like conditions where the skin is inflamed, red and irritated. The most severe and long-lasting type of eczema is atopic dermatitis. During a flare-up, the skin becomes extremely red, itchy and scaly. This skin condition can be widespread, or may be confined to only a few areas on the body. Eczema is not contagious, although if you have a family history of eczema, your risk for the disease increases. Generally, atopic dermatitis affects infants or young children and may last until the child reaches adulthood.

The appearance and symptoms for atopic dermatitis will vary for each person. Intense itching is the most common symptom, which can lead to severe discomfort and/or loss of sleep. Other common symptoms of eczema include:

  • Dry, red and extremely itchy patches of skin
  • Cracked, inflamed and scaly skin
  • Small bumps or blisters that ooze and weep
  • In infants, the rash generally appears on the cheeks and around the mouth

Eczema outbreaks are caused by an over-reaction of your skin’s immune system to environmental and emotional triggers, such as temperature, chemicals, dust, mold or stress. While there is currently no cure, eczema sufferers can practice self-care at home to help reduce flare-ups. Lifestyle adjustments are the best line of defense in controlling all types of eczema. Goals of treatment include reducing inflammation, decreasing risk of infection and alleviating the itch. To minimize symptoms and outbreaks:

  • Moisturize every day to prevent dryness and cracking
  • Limit contact with irritants, such as soaps, jewelry, and detergents
  • Avoid sudden changes in temperatures, as over-heating and sweating are common triggers of flare-ups
  • Reduce stress and anxiety
  • Minimize exposure to mold, pollens and animal dander
  • Opt for cotton, loose-fitting clothes and avoid wool and other rough materials

Treatment for eczema begins with a proper diagnosis from a board certified dermatologist. If you are diagnosed with eczema, the dermatologist can explain your type of eczema and can work with you to tailor a treatment plan that meets your individual needs to effectively manage the symptoms. If you or a loved one are struggling with eczema, contact Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center at (540) 341-1900 to schedule an appointment with one of our Board Certified Dermatology Specialists for help.

By Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center
July 15, 2016
Category: Dermatology

This time of year, you are bound to encounter plenty of flying pests, who threaten to put a damper on your summer fun. Most everyone has had an insect bite or sting at some point. Most bites or stings, whether from mosquitoes, flies, bees, or wasps, result in a mild reaction to the venom or other protein that the insect injects into you. This can result in redness, minor swelling, pain, and itching at the site of the bite or sting. But, some people develop a severe allergic reaction to an insect sting (most often from a bee or wasp) This may result in nausea or vomiting; swelling of the face, lips or throat; hives; or breathing problems. If you or someone you know begins experiencing these severe symptoms shortly after an insect bite or sting, call 911 and get to an emergency room as soon as possible. A severe, whole-body allergic reaction is called anaphylaxis. This can be life-threatening, if not treated promptly.

Most reactions, however, are relatively mild. Try these helpful
First Aid Care Tips for Mild Reactions:

  • If the stinger is still in the skin, remove it by gently scraping across the skin with a flat-edged object like a credit card.
  • Wash the area with soap and water.
  • Place a cold compress or an ice pack (wrapped in a cloth to protect the skin) on the sting or bite for about 10 minutes to reduce pain and swelling.
  • Apply calamine lotion, an antihistamine cream, or a paste of baking soda and water to the area several times a day until itching and pain are resolved.

If you have a persistent rash or hives that do not clear up on their own, see a Board Certified Dermatologist, like Dr. Caballero at Warrenton Dermatology, for professional assistance.