Our Dermatology Blog

Posts for tag: safety

By WARRENTON DERMATOLOGY & SKIN THERAPY CENTER
June 05, 2019
Category: Skin Care
Tags: safety   anti-aging   cosmetic procedures   Botox  

Do you wish you could smooth away lines and wrinkles from your face?

Have you been contemplating ways to refresh and rejuvenate your appearance? If so, then you may be wondering what options are out Botoxthere that can target and reduce the appearance of lines and wrinkles. One amazing and non-invasive option for smoothing away wrinkles and improving the overall youthfulness of your appearance is Botox. Find out why countless men and women are turning to our Warrenton, VA, board-certified dermatologist Dr. J.C. Caballero for Botox treatment.

How does Botox work?

Botox is applied using very thin needles that contain a purified, medical-grade form of a neurotoxin known as botulinum toxin. Once Botox is injected into specific muscle groups of the face, it temporarily relaxes the muscles and prevents them from contracting. As a result, this lessens the appearance of certain wrinkles and lines and smooths out the skin.

Is Botox safe?

While all treatments come with side effects and potential complications, when Botox is administered by a board-certified dermatologist, such as our Warrenton, VA, skin doctor, you can expect that you are getting a very safe and effective treatment each and every time. There are a lot of Botox parties and spas that offer this service, but not everyone knows how to properly administer this treatment. This is why turning to a board-certified dermatologist is your safest option for beautiful results and to prevent unwanted side effects.

What can Botox do for me?

Botox will target certain wrinkles and lines that have formed as a result of repeated muscle contractions. This includes wrinkles around the forehead and eyebrows, crow’s feet (lines around the eyes), wrinkles around the chin and also laugh lines (lines around the mouth). If you are dealing with any of these issues then Botox may be right for you.

How long does Botox treatment take?

The treatment itself is extremely quick, only taking a few minutes. Of course, if you want us to apply a numbing gel to the area prior to getting Botox then we will need to wait until the gel has taken full effect before administering your treatment. If you choose not to numb the area beforehand, the treatment takes less than 10 minutes.

How long do results last?

This will vary from person to person, but most of the time Botox lasts anywhere from 3 to 4 months. If you love your results, you may also choose to get maintenance injections to refresh your appearance.

Are you interested in getting Botox in Warrenton, VA? You might be, if you are ready to say goodbye to those pesky facial lines. To find out if you are an ideal candidate for Botox call Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center today to schedule a consultation.

By WARRENTON DERMATOLOGY & SKIN THERAPY CENTER
February 26, 2019
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: safety   skin health   Winter  

When the temperature dips below freezing, it’s critical to protect your skin from cold-weather health risks. Frostbite occurs when the skin (and sometimes the tissue beneath the skin) freezes due to prolonged exposure to cold temperatures. Depending on how long and how frozen the tissue, frostbite can result in severe, sometimes permanent, damage.

To stay warm and prevent frostbite, follow these tips from dermatologists:

  1. Dress in loose, light, comfortable layers: Wearing loose, light layers helps trap warm air. The first layer should be made of a synthetic material, which wicks moisture away from your body. The next layer should be insulating. Wool and fleece are good insulators and hold in more body heat than cotton. The top layer should be windproof and waterproof. A down parka and ski pants can help keep you dry and warm during outdoor activities.

  2. Protect your feet and toes: To protect your feet and toes, wear two pairs of socks. The first pair, next to your skin, should be made of moisture-wicking fabric. Place a pair of wool or wool-blend socks on top of those. Your boots should also provide adequate insulation. They should be waterproof and cover your ankles. Make sure that nothing feels tight, as tight clothing increases the risk of frostbite.

  3. Protect your head: To protect your ears and head, wear a heavy wool or fleece hat. If you are outside on a bitterly cold day, cover your face with a scarf or face mask. This warms the air you breathe and helps prevent frostbite on your nose and face.

  4. Protect your hands: Wear insulated mittens or gloves to help protect your hands from the cold.

  5. Make sure snow cannot get inside of your boots or clothing: Wet clothing increases the risk of developing frostbite. Before heading outdoors, make sure that snow cannot easily get inside of your boots or clothing. While outdoors, if you start to sweat, cut back on your activity or unzip your jacket a bit.

  6. Keep yourself hydrated: Becoming dehydrated also increases the risk of developing frostbite. Even if you are not thirsty, drink at least one glass of water before you head outside, and always drink water or a sports drink before an outdoor workout. In addition, avoid alcohol, as it increases your risk for frostbite.

  7. Recognize the symptoms: In order to detect frostbite early, when it’s most treatable, it’s important to recognize the symptoms.  The first signs of frostbite include redness and a stinging, burning, throbbing or prickling sensation followed by numbness. If this occurs, head indoors immediately.

If you experience symptoms of frostbite, try to gradually bring feeling back into the body. Never rub frostbitten skin or submerge your hands or feet directly into hot water; use warm water or a warm washcloth instead. If you do not feel sensation returning to your body, or if the skin begins to turn gray, go to an emergency room immediately.

July 13, 2018
Category: Dermatology
Tags: safety   Tips   sun exposure   Burns  

According to dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), first-degree burns are very common and frequently occur after accidentally touching a hot stove, curling iron or hair straightener. Sunburn can also be a first-degree burn. Burns can easily happen during summer firework and campfire season; However, unlike the more severe second or third-degree burns, first-degree burns only involve the top layer of the skin. If you have a first-degree burn, your skin may be red and painful, and you may experience mild swelling.

“Most first-degree burns can be treated at home, however, it’s important to know what to do,” says boardcertified dermatologist Darrell S. Rigel, MD, a clinical professor at New York University. “Although first-degree burns aren’t as serious as higher-degree burns, they can hurt quite a bit and can leave a scar if not properly treated.”

To treat a first-degree burn, Dr. Rigel recommends the following:

  1. Cool the burn. Immediately immerse the burn in cool tap water or apply cold, wet compresses. Do this for about 10 minutes or until the pain subsides.
  2. Apply petroleum jelly two to three times daily. Do not apply ointments, toothpaste or butter to the burn, as these may cause an infection. Do not apply topical antibiotics.
  3. Cover the burn with a nonstick, sterile bandage. If blisters form, let them heal on their own while keeping the area covered. Do not pop the blisters.
  4. Consider taking over-the-counter pain medication. Acetaminophen or ibuprofen can help relieve the pain and reduce inflammation.
  5. Protect the area from the sun. Once the burn heals, protect it from the sun by seeking shade, wearing protective clothing, or applying a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. This will help minimize scarring, as the redness from a burn sometimes persists for weeks, especially in those with darker skin tones.

“First-degree burns usually heal on their own without treatment from a doctor,” says Dr. Rigel. “However, if your first-degree burn is very large, if the victim is an infant or elderly person, or if you think your burn is more severe, go to an emergency room immediately.”

By Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center
April 26, 2016
Category: Nail Health

Changes in Your Fingernails/Toenails

Can Signal Larger Health Problems

 

Important information about nail health from the American Academy of Dermatology:

Our nails often reflect our general state of health. Changes in the nail, such as discoloration or thickening, can signal health problems, including liver and kidney disease, heart and lung conditions, anemia, and diabetes. Symptoms that could signal nail problems include changes in color, shape and/or thickness, swelling of the skin around the nails, bleeding or discharge, and pain. See your dermatologist for the successful diagnosis and treatment of nail problems, and to find out if they are indicating a greater issue with your overall health.

Nail growth

  • Fingernails grow faster than toenails — especially on one’s dominant hand.

  • On average, fingernails grow 3.5 mm per month, while toenails grow about 1.6 mm per month.1

  • Nail growth rates depend on age, health status, time of year, activity level and heredity.

  • Women’s nails grow more slowly than men’s, except possibly during pregnancy.

  • Nails grow more rapidly in summer than in winter.

  • Nail growth is affected by disease, nutrition, medications, trauma, chronic illness, fever and the aging process.

Nail problems

  • Nail problems make up about 10 percent of all dermatologic conditions.2

  • Nail problems usually increase throughout life and affect a high number of senior citizens.3

  • Fungal infections cause about half of all nail disorders.4 They are more common in toenails because the toes are confined in a warm, moist, weight-bearing environment.

  • Melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, can grow under the nail in rare cases. Such melanomas may be mistaken for injuries, so a dermatologist should be consulted if a dark-colored streak appears within the nail plate, if the nail discoloration does not gradually improve or if the size of the streak increases over time.5

  • Other common nail problems include:

  • White spots after an injury to the nail.

  • Vertical lines, known as splinter hemorrhages, under the nails caused by nail injury or certain drugs and diseases.

  • Bacterial infections, most often due to injury, poor skin hygiene, nail biting, finger sucking or frequent exposure to water.

  • Ingrown toenails, caused by improper nail trimming, poor stance, digestive problems or tight shoes.

  • Do not try to self-treat ingrown toenails, especially if they are infected. See a dermatologist.

  • Nail problems are more common in those with diabetes or poor circulation. At the first sign of a problem, see a dermatologist.

 

Tips for keeping nails healthy

  • Keep nails clean and dry to prevent bacteria from collecting under the nail.

  • Cut your fingernails and toenails straight across and rounded slightly in the center. This will keep your nails strong and help you avoid ingrown toenails.

  • When toenails are thick and difficult to cut, soak feet in warm salt water (one teaspoon of salt per pint of water) for five to 10 minutes, and then apply urea or lactic acid cream. This softens the nails, making them easier to trim.

  • Wear proper-fitting shoes and alternate shoes on a regular basis. Tight shoes can cause ingrown toenails.

  • Do not bite your fingernails; this can transfer infectious organisms between your fingers and mouth. Nail biting also can damage the skin around your fingers, allowing infections to enter.

  • Apply a cream to moisturize your nails, especially after removing nail polish, since most polish removers contain chemicals that dry the nails.

  • If you want to wear a bright red or orange polish, prevent discoloration by applying an extra layer of base coat. If your nails become yellowed and discolored from the polish, they should return to their normal color over several weeks if the same polish is not reapplied.

Nail salon safety

  • While most nail salons follow strict sanitation guidelines, consumers should check to make sure that the salon, the manicure stations, the footbaths and the tools are clean, and that the technicians wash their hands between clients.6

  • Consumers who get frequent manicures and pedicures should bring their own tools to the salon.

  • Don’t let a nail technician cut or push back your cuticle. It may allow an infection to develop.

  • Do not wear artificial nails to cover up nail problems, as this may make those problems worse. Artificial nails are not recommended for people who are prone to fungal infections or have brittle nails. For people with healthy nails, artificial nails can be fine as long as they are not worn continuously.

  • Don’t shave your lower legs for at least 24 hours before you get a pedicure. If you nick yourself while shaving, a pedicure could put you at risk for an infection.

  • If you experience itching, burning or any type of allergic reaction to a nail cosmetic, see a dermatologist.


 

1Yaemsiri S, Hou N, Slining MM, He K. Growth rate of human fingernails and toenails in healthy American young adults. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2010 Apr;24(4):420-3.

2Cashman MW, Sloan SB. Nutrition and nail disease. Clin Dermatol. 2010 Jul-Aug;28(4):420-5.

3Abdullah L, Abbas O. Common nail changes and disorders in older people: Diagnosis and management. Can Fam Physician. 2011 Feb;57(2):173-81.

4Ghannoum MA, Hajjeh RA, Scher R, Konnikov N, Gupta AK, Summerbell R, Sullivan S, Daniel R, Krusinski P, Fleckman P, Rich P, Odom R, Aly R, Pariser D, Zaiac M, Rebell G, Lesher J, Gerlach B, Ponce-De-Leon GF, Ghannoum A, Warner J, Isham N, Elewski B. A large-scale North American study of fungal isolates from nails: the frequency of onychomycosis, fungal distribution, and antifungal susceptibility patterns. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2000 Oct;43(4):641-8.

5Kottschade LA, Grotz TE, Dronca RS, Salomao DR, Pulido JS, Wasif N, et al. Rare presentations of primary melanoma and special populations: a systematic review. Am J Clin Oncol. 2014 Dec;37(6):635-41

6Stout JE, Gadkowski LB, Rath S, Alspaugh JA, Miller MB, Cox GM. Pedicure-associated rapidly growing mycobacterial infection: an endemic disease. Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Oct;53(8):787-92.