Our Dermatology Blog

Posts for tag: skin health

By WARRENTON DERMATOLOGY & SKIN THERAPY CENTER
February 26, 2019
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: safety   skin health   Winter  

When the temperature dips below freezing, it’s critical to protect your skin from cold-weather health risks. Frostbite occurs when the skin (and sometimes the tissue beneath the skin) freezes due to prolonged exposure to cold temperatures. Depending on how long and how frozen the tissue, frostbite can result in severe, sometimes permanent, damage.

To stay warm and prevent frostbite, follow these tips from dermatologists:

  1. Dress in loose, light, comfortable layers: Wearing loose, light layers helps trap warm air. The first layer should be made of a synthetic material, which wicks moisture away from your body. The next layer should be insulating. Wool and fleece are good insulators and hold in more body heat than cotton. The top layer should be windproof and waterproof. A down parka and ski pants can help keep you dry and warm during outdoor activities.

  2. Protect your feet and toes: To protect your feet and toes, wear two pairs of socks. The first pair, next to your skin, should be made of moisture-wicking fabric. Place a pair of wool or wool-blend socks on top of those. Your boots should also provide adequate insulation. They should be waterproof and cover your ankles. Make sure that nothing feels tight, as tight clothing increases the risk of frostbite.

  3. Protect your head: To protect your ears and head, wear a heavy wool or fleece hat. If you are outside on a bitterly cold day, cover your face with a scarf or face mask. This warms the air you breathe and helps prevent frostbite on your nose and face.

  4. Protect your hands: Wear insulated mittens or gloves to help protect your hands from the cold.

  5. Make sure snow cannot get inside of your boots or clothing: Wet clothing increases the risk of developing frostbite. Before heading outdoors, make sure that snow cannot easily get inside of your boots or clothing. While outdoors, if you start to sweat, cut back on your activity or unzip your jacket a bit.

  6. Keep yourself hydrated: Becoming dehydrated also increases the risk of developing frostbite. Even if you are not thirsty, drink at least one glass of water before you head outside, and always drink water or a sports drink before an outdoor workout. In addition, avoid alcohol, as it increases your risk for frostbite.

  7. Recognize the symptoms: In order to detect frostbite early, when it’s most treatable, it’s important to recognize the symptoms.  The first signs of frostbite include redness and a stinging, burning, throbbing or prickling sensation followed by numbness. If this occurs, head indoors immediately.

If you experience symptoms of frostbite, try to gradually bring feeling back into the body. Never rub frostbitten skin or submerge your hands or feet directly into hot water; use warm water or a warm washcloth instead. If you do not feel sensation returning to your body, or if the skin begins to turn gray, go to an emergency room immediately.

By WARRENTON DERMATOLOGY & SKIN THERAPY CENTER
November 23, 2016
Category: Skin Care

Winter means battling harsh weather conditions and even harsher skin conditions. This means that you will need to have a seasonal skincare shift:

Exfoliate and Hydrate

For most people, winter brings dry, dehydrated skin to the forefront. However, proper exfoliation must be accomplished before serious hydration can occur. Dead skin cells, sebum, product accumulation, and makeup debris block the pores and prevent moisturizing products from actually doing their jobs. Unfortunately, the granular exfoliating scrubs most often found over-the-counter can compound dryness, or worse - cause micro-tearing of the skin, which may lead to a whole bunch of new skin care issues. If you are going to exfoliate at home, we recommend Finishing Touch, by Revision Skincare. This weekly exfoliating facial scrub contains ultra-fine Polynesian Volcanic Black Sand and Freshwater Silt to deeply cleanse, polish and nourish the skin. It also contains Shea Butter – a rich, natural emollient to condition and hydrate.

Professional Microdermabrasion and mild Peels are the best options to address a number of skin concerns. Unlike scrubs and everyday products, microdermabrasion and peels will remove several layers of the epidermis in one session, and will allow for more intense hydration which could never be achieved with a home remedy. The treatment is also affordable, fast and effective, with no downtime afterward. The best time for microdermabrasion or a peel is when you can stay out of the sun for a few days. Although these are non-invasive treatments, they do leave the skin vulnerable to the sun’s strong rays, so cold weather months when we spend more time indoors are a wonderful time to start a series of treatments, as long as you are still using your sunscreen.

Renew and Repair

During the summer, many people develop dark spots and fine lines from all the time spent in the sun. Microdermabrasion and peels are also recommended to repair these conditions and to naturally boost production of collagen and elastin. Skin naturally repairs itself, but as we grow older we produce far less of the good stuff that keeps us looking young. Regular professional treatments can be a very effective method of staving off the signs of aging by advancing the production of important proteins in the skin.

Protect

You still need sunscreen protection in the winter months! It may not be hot outside, but your skin is still being exposed to the sun’s rays. It’s easy to protect your face with an all-in-one daily moisturizer with sunscreen and antioxidants, which takes care of all your daytime hydration and protection needs in one quick and easy step. We recommend Total Defense + Repair by SkinMedica, or Intellishade by Revision Skincare, both of which are available at Warrenton Dermatology.
To protect your entire body, try EltaMD’s UV Lotion – a full-body moisturizer with SPF 30 sun protection. Apply to moist skin just after showering for maximum effectiveness.

Call Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center at 540-341-1900 today to book a treatment, or schedule a complimentary consultation to talk about your winter skincare needs and which of these treatment options might be right for you

By WARRENTON DERMATOLOGY & SKIN THERAPY CENTER
September 23, 2016
Category: Skin Health

There have been many studies about how diet impacts skin disease. The exciting takeaway from most of these studies is that we can, in part, control our overall skin health and appearance through diet. One such study of the Mediterranean diet, which is considered anti-inflammatory and low glycemic, revealed several skin health benefits worth noting.

“To maintain healthy skin, one’s diet must be rich in antioxidants, which are also anti-inflammatory,” says Dermatologist Jeanette Jacknin, MD. “Free radical damage has been shown to be an important factor in the aging process, as well as in the development of cancer. It is also thought to be the root cause of wrinkles and aging skin with sagging, discoloration, enlarged pores, and lack of radiance. Unfortunately, the typical North American diet contains excessive amounts of simple carbohydrates and saturated fats, which has been shown to correlate with an increased appearance of skin wrinkles and other skin problems.”

According to Dr. Jacknin, “The Mediterranean diet is beneficial for the skin, as its anti-inflammatory effect is due largely to its emphasis on extra virgin olive oil, which is high in compounds that modulate oxidative stress and quell inflammatory reactions.” Oleocanthal, one of the components of olive oil, has recently been shown to possess anti-inflammatory actions similar to ibuprofen. It has also been suggested that a nutritional approach to sun protection using the Mediterranean diet would be a useful complement to topically applied sun protection.

Healthy skin is also well-hydrated skin, and it is recommended that we drink a minimum of eight glasses of pure or sparkling water a day, and limit our intake of dehydrating coffee, alcohol, and colas. Eat fish, rolled oats and ground flax seeds frequently, as they are high in omega-3 essential fatty acids which help the skin to retain moisture. Grapes, berries, plums, pears, seaweeds and algae all contain sorbitol, which also helps prevent dehydration. Source: Dermatology Times