Our Dermatology Blog

Posts for tag: topical treatments

April 28, 2017
Category: Uncategorized

Parabens are preservatives frequently used in skin care products. They were commercialized in the 1950s and possess antifungal and antibacterial properties. About 90% of grocery items contain parabens, as they are found in just about everything from deodorants to toothpaste, shampoo, hair conditioner, cosmetics and body lotion.

The role of parabens in product formulation is to kill fungus and bacteria that might grow in the bottle causing contamination and spoilage. Most skin care products must sit on the shelf for 3-6 months prior to purchase and then sit on the purchaser’s shelf for another year. Providing safe products that consumers can use with confidence requires preservatives of some kind.

The concept of preservation is not unique to skin care products. Even Mother Nature uses preservatives. Methylparaben is found in blueberries (consumed by humans) where it functions as a natural antimicrobial to prevent the berries from spoiling. Even plants have parabens to allow their seeds to be spread in a viable form over the earth.

Safety concerns over parabens arose because they can mimic estrogen by binding to estrogen receptors. Parabens have been considered as a possible cause of early puberty in females, lower fertility in males, and even breast cancer. However, at the present time, the US FDA has determined that paraben preservatives are safe at the levels currently used.

By WARRENTON DERMATOLOGY & SKIN THERAPY CENTER
December 27, 2016
Category: Skin Care

Article Excerpts from Dermatology Times

Many state-of- the-art skin products contain vitamin C, a potent antioxidant which is important to skin health. Vitamin C is actually a secondary antioxidant in the skin, able to donate an electron to vitamin E, which is the primary antioxidant. As part of the electron donation process, the vitamin C itself becomes oxidized. This process can be observed on a daily basis when cut fruit is left out. Freshly cut peaches have a vivid orange/yellow color due to their high vitamin C content. However, left on the table for several hours at room temperature, the peaches will turn brown. This browning is due to oxidation of the vitamin C, and the color change is due to a chemical reaction occurring as the electron is lost. Once the electron is lost, the vitamin C is no longer an active vitamin, meaning the vitamin C content/benefit of a fresh cut peach is much higher than the vitamin C content/benefit of a browned peach.

Now consider vitamin C serums for facial anti-aging purposes.  When in the vitamin C is in high concentration, the serum will have a yellowish color; but as it oxidizes, it will turn brown/orange.  Cosmetic vitamin C preparations that have discolored should be discarded as they have already oxidized and cannot provide skin benefits.  Vitamin C preparations can also discolor on the skin surface as they contact oxygen in the environment.  This accounts for the orange color that may emerge on the skin in the morning after wearing a vitamin C preparation overnight. For this reason, vitamin C serums should be stored in dark packaging that does not allow light or oxygen to reach the product.  It is also important that you not leave packaging open to the air for an extended period of time.

Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center recommends these vitamin C products for daytime anti-aging and anti-oxidant protection:

Serum: IS Clinical Pro-Heal Serum for Face & C Eye Serum for the eye area

Lotion: Revision Skincare Vitamin C Lotion 30%

By WARRENTON DERMATOLOGY & SKIN THERAPY CENTER
November 23, 2016
Category: Skin Care

Winter means battling harsh weather conditions and even harsher skin conditions. This means that you will need to have a seasonal skincare shift:

Exfoliate and Hydrate

For most people, winter brings dry, dehydrated skin to the forefront. However, proper exfoliation must be accomplished before serious hydration can occur. Dead skin cells, sebum, product accumulation, and makeup debris block the pores and prevent moisturizing products from actually doing their jobs. Unfortunately, the granular exfoliating scrubs most often found over-the-counter can compound dryness, or worse - cause micro-tearing of the skin, which may lead to a whole bunch of new skin care issues. If you are going to exfoliate at home, we recommend Finishing Touch, by Revision Skincare. This weekly exfoliating facial scrub contains ultra-fine Polynesian Volcanic Black Sand and Freshwater Silt to deeply cleanse, polish and nourish the skin. It also contains Shea Butter – a rich, natural emollient to condition and hydrate.

Professional Microdermabrasion and mild Peels are the best options to address a number of skin concerns. Unlike scrubs and everyday products, microdermabrasion and peels will remove several layers of the epidermis in one session, and will allow for more intense hydration which could never be achieved with a home remedy. The treatment is also affordable, fast and effective, with no downtime afterward. The best time for microdermabrasion or a peel is when you can stay out of the sun for a few days. Although these are non-invasive treatments, they do leave the skin vulnerable to the sun’s strong rays, so cold weather months when we spend more time indoors are a wonderful time to start a series of treatments, as long as you are still using your sunscreen.

Renew and Repair

During the summer, many people develop dark spots and fine lines from all the time spent in the sun. Microdermabrasion and peels are also recommended to repair these conditions and to naturally boost production of collagen and elastin. Skin naturally repairs itself, but as we grow older we produce far less of the good stuff that keeps us looking young. Regular professional treatments can be a very effective method of staving off the signs of aging by advancing the production of important proteins in the skin.

Protect

You still need sunscreen protection in the winter months! It may not be hot outside, but your skin is still being exposed to the sun’s rays. It’s easy to protect your face with an all-in-one daily moisturizer with sunscreen and antioxidants, which takes care of all your daytime hydration and protection needs in one quick and easy step. We recommend Total Defense + Repair by SkinMedica, or Intellishade by Revision Skincare, both of which are available at Warrenton Dermatology.
To protect your entire body, try EltaMD’s UV Lotion – a full-body moisturizer with SPF 30 sun protection. Apply to moist skin just after showering for maximum effectiveness.

Call Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center at 540-341-1900 today to book a treatment, or schedule a complimentary consultation to talk about your winter skincare needs and which of these treatment options might be right for you

By Warrenton Dermatology & Skin Therapy Center
August 03, 2016
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Lice   hair   treatments   topical treatments  

Excerpts from Dermatology Times 7/20/16

School will soon be back in session, and unfortunately, this usually means an uptick in the incidence of head-lice. Do you know what to do if your child comes home from school with lice?

Here are a few helpful tidbits about the world of lice: Head lice die in one to two days without feeding, and nits die within a week and cannot hatch if they are not near the scalp; Nits (lice eggs) alone do not indicate contagiousness; However, behaviors such as sharing brushes, combs or pillows could transfer nits or lice from person to person; Once hatched, lice move by crawling – they cannot hop or fly; Pets do not play a role in transmission of human lice.

What to Do

If lice are found on someone, machine wash and dry all clothing and bed linens worn or used in the two days before treatment. Items that can’t be washed should be placed in sealed plastic bags for two weeks. Soak combs and brushes in hot water (at least 130°F) for five minutes. And vacuum the floor and furniture around where the infested person sits or sleeps, then discard the vacuum contents in a sealed plastic bag. In addition to these actions, topical treatments may be used to kill the lice and nits on the persons scalp and hair.

Topical Treatments

According to Dr. Raegan Hunt, lice are becoming more immune to traditional over-the-counter treatments like Rid and Nix. Earlier this year, a study examined head lice in 48 states and found 98% had developed mutations. The good news: “There are several fairly recently FDA-approved topical lice treatments that can be used to combat the resistant ‘super lice,’” says Dr. Hunt, a pediatric dermatologist at Texas Children's Hospital:

  • Well-known treatments, such as Rid or Nix, are comprised of permethrin lotion 1%, and may not work due to the development of drug resistance.

  • Malathion lotion 0.5% (Ovide) works in a single application for most patients, but is limited to those 6 and older. Resistance has been reported in the United Kingdom.

  • Ivermectin lotion 0.5% (Sklice) got FDA approval in 2012. It kills baby lice (nymphs) and works as a single application on dry hair without nit combing. It’s approved for children 6 months and older.

  • Spinosad 0.9% topical suspension (Natroba) was approved by the FDA in 2011. It’s approved for children aged 4 and up, and is also effective as a single application on dry hair without nit combing. Retreatment is usually not needed.

  • Benzyl alcohol lotion 5% (Ulesfia) received FDA approval in 2009 and requires repeat treatment on the ninth day. It’s approved for ages 6 months to 60 years.

After treatment, if you see large, live lice, they may be a sign of a re-infestation. Also, according to Dr. Hunt, lice of different sizes can be a sign of possible resistance to treatment.